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Best New Female Rapper From Detroit | Queen Monkeei

Queen Monkeei | New Next Female Rap Artist From Detroit | “Bricks” Music Video 2018 “Beatrix Kiddo

WHOS NEXT UP FROM THE D? KASH DOLL, MOLLY BRAZY, DEJ LOAF, NOW QUEEN MONKEEI?

When I first encountered Queen Monkeei, I was surprised when she told me she rapped. This was because her tone was soft, her persona was extremely mild. Like a calm and quieting brewing storm. And to me this is what completely separates Queen from the rest of Detroit’s female rap movement. She’s tough, as any other male or female born and raised in the D, but her tough was very different to me.

It’s like a Godfather tough. You can tell her intelligence in her manner as she speaks to you and how she respects and observe your space and position, as would the Godfather. The Godfather would always respect a man, just so long as this man like wise return the gesture. But we all know what happens if you turn on The GF.

I met The Queen of Detroit at an Open Mic on E. Warren at The Club Royalty. I asked her and her colleagues to participate in a commercial we was filming on behalf of Open Mic Nights “I Am Dope” presented by Flex Ya Skillz Ent. With his daughter Taij B. as a second host and headliner of the shows. Queen Monkeei’s vibe was as if she was just a fan, until she told me she was performing as well. But like all new comers she was one of the last to perform.

Most people were leaving, of course because most Detroiters miss supporting each other after they receive all the support they need. Anyway I decided to stay, and boy I’m glad I did. Her performance was shocking. Not to just me, but to the entire audience. Her humble appearance, and even the way she presented the song on stage was displayed in a way where she was not to sure if her performance was going to be good or not. But The Queen had as all psyched out!!!



What I loved about Queen Monkeei was her demeanor. She got this tough kid next door vibe that would never pick a fight or bully you, but if someone ever tried you she would bring that pit bull part of her out and respond accordingly. You’d never think she was tough on the outset, but her words, and the way she used them had so much passion, truth, grit, reality and pain behind it you felt it and you knew it was real. You find yourself feeling drawn to it because of the authenticity of it. It felt like you knew her your whole life, her bounce, her lingo, her slang, they way she says her rhymes with character, intrigue and authority.

Her choice of beats and production, the music she decided to rhyme to even compliments the whole creation.

Queen Monkeei’s creativity is through the roof. Coming from Detroit as a female rapper ain’t easy. You really gotta fight hard to win over the ears of a hardened city guy, but with her, it’s no effort. After her performance the crowd gave her a loud round of applause. Now keep in mind, this is Detroit, WE DON’T CARE ABOUT NOOOOOOBODY!!!! And yet, this mild manner, quiet toned round away girl, came, rocked, shook us woke and helped us to recognize, there’s truly a new and satisfying female rap artist on the rise from Detroit.

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YANNY VS LAUREL Explained Hidden Message Perhaps Another Great Distraction




YANNY VS LAUREL Explained Hidden Message Perhaps Another Great Distraction The audio version of “the dress” cleaved the internet, and likely your family, your friends, or your office, into two bitterly divided camps on Tuesday: the Laurels and the Yannys.

It began, as it so often does, with a viral clip posted by a high schooler on Reddit, which blew up when Cloe Feldman, a YouTuber and social media influencer, added it to her Instagram story and then to Twitter, asking, “What do you hear?! Yanny or Laurel.” That should have settled it, because it’s obviously “Laurel.” But people out there are convinced, for some reason, that this weird robot voice is repeating “Yanny.” (Some people even claim they alternate between hearing “Laurel” and “Yanny,” or, strangest of all, hear both simultaneously. Some people even hear “Geery” or “Garry” or something in between.)

So what’s going on here? The clip is playing around with frequency and it depends on the range of frequencies listeners hear.

What “Yanny” and “Laurel” have in common “There’s just enough ambiguity in this fairly low-quality recording that [some] people are hearing it one way and some people are hearing it another,” Brad Story, the associate department head of speech, language, and hearing sciences at Arizona State University, told me.

Humans typically pay attention to three different frequencies when they’re listening to speech. Story said the lowest of the three frequencies is “absolutely essential” for the L’s and R’s — the consonants that make up “Laurel.” “So when you’re listening to ‘Laurel,’ the reason you get L, R, and L is because of the movement of that third frequency,” he said.

Here’s the catch. The word “Yanny,” the second frequency, has almost exactly the same pattern as the L, R, L in “Laurel,” he added. One reason for the confusion is the poor quality of the recording. “Typically, if you have a high-quality recording and you’re listening on a good device of some sort, you’re not ever going to be confused by those,” Story said.

So if you’re hearing “Laurel,” you’re likely picking up on the lower frequency. If you hear “Yanny,” you’re picking up on the higher frequency.

It really comes down to how our brains pick up on and interpret these frequencies, a professor of linguistics at the University of Hawaii, said. He suggested that isolating these frequencies basically homes in on the critical information, making it easier for the brain to pay attention to just “Laurel” or just “Yanny.” Good news for both “Laurel” and “Yanny” people: the clip is pretty confusing People might be able to focus on the higher frequencies — the Yannys among us — because they have really great headphones or very good hearing, Benjamin Munson, a professor of speech, language, and hearing sciences at University of Minnesota, suggested.

“But for the rest of us with po’folk headphones and old-folk hearing, we just hear the lowest-frequency components,” he wrote in an email.

But don’t panic too much about your hearing if you’re on Team Laurel. One likely source of the confusion is the clip itself, which doesn’t correspond to the sounds humans generally make when they’re speaking. Vowels and some consonants, like the those heard in “Laurel” and “Yanny,” have many frequencies when humans pronounce them through the vocal tract, Munson wrote, not unlike “hundreds of tuning forks playing at once.”

This is a spectrogram (a visual representation of those frequencies) of the “Laurel versus Yanny” meme. The dark bands represent what are known as “formants,” the frequencies that resonate the loudest. Vowels pronounced by humans have multiple formants, but the first two formants (F1 and F2) are crucial to determining what the vowel sounds like — such as whether you’re making an “eee” sound or an “ooo” sound. “I heard the higher-frequency formant sequences when I first listened to this signal two hours ago and thought that they maybe were someone talking in the background. Then I thought ERMERGERD, IT’S THE AUDIO VERSION OF THE RING,” Munson joked.

There isn’t actually another voice in there, he said. It’s just the lower-frequency patterns repeated at a higher frequency. Again, that mismatch — or “shenanigans,” as Munson called it — doesn’t happen with human speech.

Why this is going on in the Laurel/Yanny clip is less clear. “One possibility is that the formant pattern at the higher frequencies is just ‘Laurel’ transposed to higher frequencies, and that ‘Laurel’ sounds like [‘Yanny’] at higher frequencies,” Munson wrote. Another guess is that “Laurel” and “Yanny” got smashed together. But all this confusion — those so-called “shenanigans” — forces our brains to fill in the blanks of how the clip should sound.

It’s possible that knowing there are two choices — “Laurel” and “Yanny” — preps us to hear one or the other distinctly. Or listeners could be affected by the language they speak, or the last thing they were listening to before they clicked on the meme.

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